Jun
17
12:30 PM12:30

Antiuniversity / Autographic Zine Workshop

The workshop is an inclusive space for exploring and thinking about identity through autographic image making, storytelling and zine-making. A briefing session on Monday 17th will give you an overview of available drawing and image-making techniques.

Tuesday is time for you to gather images independently.

On Wednesday we will meet back at the art school and workshop stories and sequences for your zine, on your own or with help from the workshop team. Once you’ve created your images / stories we will endeavour to produce a set of zines that you will be invited to display at the Liverpool school of Art and Design.

FREE PLACES: Please book via eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/antiuniversity-autographic-zine-workshop-tickets-60687297340

The John Lennon Art & Design Building has lifts and step-free access.

This event is part of the Antiuniversity Now festival 15-22 June 2019.
See the full programme on www.antiuniversity.org
By signing up to this event you will be added to the Anituniversity mailing list. To opt out please email antiuniversitynow@gmail.com

Organised by Bee Hughes & Matt Johnson.

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Jun
6
to Jun 8

Society for Menstrual Research Conference

Bee will present her research and the collaborative events organised for Being Human festival 2018 with Dr Kay Standing at Traversing the Ridge: Connecting Menstrual Research and Advocacy, the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research (SMCR) 2019 Conference in Colorado Springs, USA.

Performing Periods: Challenging Menstrual Normativity through Art Practice

The paper discusses interdisciplinary research, which combines art practice with socio-cultural analysis to develop artworks as spaces of resistance to the social stigma still often associated with menstruating.  We argue art can be a powerful means to confront and subvert stigma around menstruation. Art can present alternatives to the expected everyday presentation of periods we see in medical texts, advertising and pop culture. In these areas, the menstrual cycle tends to be framed as an unchanging standardised pattern. Periods themselves are portrayed as inconvenient at best, and often something to be embarrassed by.  Drawing on a range of visual and performative strategies the paper argues artwork can eschew taboos and afford insights into the usually private phenomenon of menstruation. These works subvert and challenge representations of menstruation in the media and popular culture by showing the ordinariness of this bodily function.

In the context of a broader movement of consciousness-raising and positivity around menstruation, menstrual art is often read as celebratory. We argue that foregrounding the celebration of menstruation can perpetuate essentialist readings and maintain rigid gender stereotypes, rather than break them. Instead, we argue that these artworks have greater power if understood as revelatory, rather than purely celebratory, and that they need to reflect a diverse range of menstrual, and menstruators’, experiences. Framed as revelatory, artworks can be positioned as opening spaces of resistance to expected norms and behaviours, revealing what is usually hidden. Artists working with periods present their blood, bodies, and experiences on their own terms, rather than those given to us by society.

The paper presents Bee’s artmaking practice, which is an exploration of the continued rippling effect of encountering menstruation as stuck between the medical sphere and the languages of advertising built upon maintaining the secrecy of the event of menstruation. It outlines her practice-led methods, centring upon the project Cycles (2016-17). This project utilised expanded printmaking to document how Bee deployed her body in performative gestures that illustrate a menstrual cycle that does not conform to normative notions of menstruation. We will also present an example of cut-up poetry and collaborative soundworks that appropriate and re-present online medical advice about menstruation.

This is further contextualised in comparison to selected examples of recent historical and contemporary art that engage with the subject matter of menstruation, including wok from Bee and Kay’s recent Periodical (2018) exhibition, and examples of advertisements in UK magazines from the 1960s – 1990s selected from the Femorabilia Collection, part of Liverpool John Moores University’s Special Collections and Archives.

Menstrual artworks make the invisible visible. These artworks show us what taboo demands we hide and enable the varying realities of bleeding to be shared on a public platform.

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Apr
11
to Apr 13

Talking Bodies Conference

I will be presenting my research at the Talking Bodies conference at the Institute of Gender Studies, University of Chester.

Performing Periods: Challenging Menstrual Normativity through Art Practice

The paper discusses my interdisciplinary research, which combines art practice with socio-cultural analysis to develop artworks as spaces of resistance to the social stigma still often associated with menstruating. My artmaking practice is an exploration of the continued rippling effect of encountering menstruation as stuck between the medical sphere and the languages of advertising built upon maintaining the secrecy of the event of menstruation. I will outline my practice-led methods, centring upon the project Cycles (2016-17). This project utilised expanded printmaking to document my body in performative gestures that illustrate a menstrual cycle that does not conform to normative notions of menstruation. I will also present an example of cut-up poetry and collaborative soundworks that appropriate and re-present online medical advice about menstruation. My practice will be further contextualised in comparison to selected examples of recent historical and contemporary art that engage with the subject matter of menstruation. In the context of a broader movement of consciousness-raising and positivity around menstruation, menstrual art may be read as celebratory. However, foregrounding the celebration of menstruation can perpetuate essentialist readings and maintain rigid gender stereotypes, rather than break them. Instead, I argue that these artworks have greater power if understood as revelatory, drawing on a range of visual and performative strategies to eschew taboo and afford insights into the usually private phenomenon of menstruation.

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Apr
4
to Apr 6

Association for Art History Annual Conference

I will be presenting a paper as part of the Blood in Modern and Contemporary Art Panel convened by Dr Camilla Mørk Røstvik  and Dr Neil MacDonald.

Full information on the panel can be found here.

Performing Periods: Challenging Menstrual Normativity through Art Practice

This paper discusses my interdisciplinary research, which combines art practice with socio-cultural analysis to develop artworks as spaces of resistance to the social stigma still often associated with menstruating. My artmaking practice is an exploration of the continued rippling effect of encountering menstruation as stuck between the medical sphere and the languages of advertising built upon maintaining the secrecy of the event of menstruation. I will outline my practice-led methods, centring upon the project Cycles (2016-17). This project utilised expanded printmaking to document my body in performative gestures that illustrate a menstrual cycle that does not conform to normative notions of menstruation. I will also present an example of cut-up poetry and collaborative soundworks that appropriate and re-present online medical advice about menstruation. My practice will be further contextualised in comparison to selected examples of recent historical and contemporary art that engage with the subject matter of menstruation. In the context of a broader movement of consciousness-raising and positivity around menstruation, menstrual art may be read as celebratory. However, foregrounding the celebration of menstruation can perpetuate essentialist readings and maintain rigid gender stereotypes, rather than break them. Instead, I argue that these artworks have greater power if understood as revelatory, drawing on a range of visual and performative strategies to eschew taboo and afford insights into the usually private phenomenon of menstruation.

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